You can download a printable copy of the tentative schedule here.

Denver University Law Review Symposium:

CrImmigration: Crossing the Border Between Criminal Law and Immigration Law

 
 

February 6 and 7, 2015

University of Denver Sturm College of Law

Ricketson Law Building

Tentative Agenda

 

Friday, February 6, 2015

 

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. | First-Floor Lobby

Registration and Breakfast

 

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. | Room 165

Welcome: Martin J. Katz, Dean of the University of Denver Sturm College of Law

 

8:45 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. | Room 165

Morning Lecture: Kevin R. Johnson, Dean of the University of California Davis School of Law

 

10:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

Mid-Morning Break

 

10:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. | Room 165

Panel 1 – The Intersection of Criminal and Immigration Enforcement

This panel will focus on crimmigration as it manifests in enforcement mechanisms. The rise of crimmigration has seen ever-increasing intertwining of criminal and immigration enforcement systems, and the growing use of criminal enforcement methods by immigration officials. The use of pre-adjudication detention is a striking example. This panel examines the methods of immigration enforcement, the personal toll enforcement has on immigrant communities, and grassroots and legal strategies aimed at resisting enforcement.

 

Anil Kalhan, Drexel University School of Law

Hans Meyer, Meyer Law Office

Debora Ortega, University of Denver

Michael J. Wishnie, Yale Law School

 

Moderator: Brittany Wiser, Denver University Law Review Staff Editor

 

12:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. | Room 165

Panel 2 (with lunch)Family Detention: Artesia and Beyond

In the summer of 2014 an influx of unaccompanied minors and families at the southern border of the United States resulted in the construction of a family detention center in Artesia, New Mexico. Family detention had been used before, but not on the scale it has since attained—a second family detention center was opened in Karnes, Texas and a third in Dilley, Texas with the largest detention capacity (2,400 family “units”) of any of the centers to date. This panel will examine the resurgence of family detention and its relation to crimmigration enforcement.

 

Lisa Graybill, University of Denver Sturm College of Law

Laura Lichter, Lichter Immigration

Jessica Rehms, University of Denver Sturm College of Law, Law Student

 

Moderator: Lindsey Dunn, Denver University Law Review Editor in Chief

 

1:15 p.m. ­­– 1:30 p.m.

Break

 

1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. | Room 165

Panel 3The Decline of Detainers

Immigration detainers have been a key enforcement tool in the crimmigration justice system. Detainers link state and local criminal law enforcement to federal immigration enforcement by providing a legal mechanism for prolonging the detention of prisoners held on local criminal charges and providing for the transfer of those prisoners into federal custody. This panel explores the rise and demise of this crimmigration enforcement tool.

 

Christopher Lasch, University of Denver Sturm College of Law

Peter L. Markowitz, Cardozo School of Law

Mark Silverstein, American Civil Liberties Union of Colorado

Juliet Stumpf, Lewis & Clark Law School

 

Moderator: Elie Zwiebel, Denver University Law Review Staff Editor

 

3:00 p.m. ­– 3:15 p.m.

Mid-Afternoon Break

 

3:15 p.m. – 4:45 p.m. | Room 165

Panel 4Immigrants and the State Criminal Justice System

This panel will explore how state criminal justice systems present challenges both to immigrants and the criminal defense attorneys representing them. State criminal justice systems have been increasingly enlisted as an immigration enforcement mechanism. State criminal laws are often used to penalize immigrants’ legal status. Even when they do not overtly penalize immigration status, state criminal convictions are an ever-expanding basis for deportation or denial of immigration benefits. This presents attorneys representing non-citizens with the increasingly difficult task of adequately representing and advising their immigrant clients through state criminal proceedings.

 

César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández, University of Denver Sturm College of Law

Annie Lai, University of California Irvine School of Law

Stephen Lee, University of California Irvine School of Law

Rebecca Sharpless, University of Miami School of Law

 

Moderator: Tyson Welch, Denver University Law Review Staff Editor 

 

Saturday, February 7, 2015

 

9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. | Forum

Registration and Breakfast

 

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. | Room 165

Morning Lecture: Jennifer M. Chacón, University of California Irvine School of Law

 

10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Mid-Morning Break

 

10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. | Room 165

Panel 5 Reform: The Future of Crimmigration

“Comprehensive immigration reform” has been both promised and postponed for years, while arguably little progress has been made on fixing the system. The President’s announcement of executive action on immigration in November 2014 was simultaneously hailed as progress by many and decried by others as an impediment to reform. This panel will discuss various approaches to reform that stem from different motivations.

 

Amanda Frost, American University Washington College of Law

Kit Johnson, University of Oklahoma College of Law

Victor Romero, Penn State School of Law

 

Moderator: Miranda Dalpiaz, Denver University Law Review Staff Editor

 

12:00 p.m. – 12:45 p.m. | Forum

Lunch

 

12:45 p.m. – 2:15 p.m. | Room 165

Panel 6 Adjudication: Individual Rights in Immigration Proceedings

The Supreme Court has acknowledged the complexity of the laws governing immigration proceedings. Yet immigrants traditionally have no right to court-appointed counsel during these crucial proceedings. This panel will address adjudication and access to counsel within immigration proceedings, including a discussion of current efforts to expand the right of counsel.

 

Lisa Graybill, University of Denver Sturm College of Law

Abbie Johnson, Rocky Mountain Immigrant Advocacy Network

Charanya Krishnaswami, 2013-14 Legal Fellow, Rocky Mountain Immigrant Advocacy Network

Peter L. Markowitz, Cardozo School of Law

Honorable Mimi Tsankov (appearing in her personal capacity), U.S. Immigration Judge, Denver Immigration Court

 

            Moderator: Colton Johnston, Denver University Law Review Staff Editor

 

2:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. | Room 165

Concluding Remarks: Professor César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández, University of Denver Sturm College of Law