Events & Announcements

Vol. 95 Emerging Scholar Award: Request for Submissions

The Denver Law Review is pleased to announce the 2017 Emerging Scholar Award. This exclusive publication opportunity is open to all scholars who (1) have received their J.D. as of March 1, 2017, (2) have not yet accepted a tenure-track teaching position, and (3) have not held a full-time teaching position for more than three years.

The selected recipient will receive an award of $500, and the Denver Law Review will publish the winning entry in Issue 1, Volume 95, scheduled for early 2018.

Click here for more information.


2017 Symposium – Justice Reinvestment: The Solution to Mass Incarceration?

Feb. 2 & 3, 2017 - Justice Reinvestment: The Solution to Mass Incarceration? The Denver Law Review presents its annual symposium on whether justice reinvestment initiatives are effective tools to end mass incarceration.

Registration is now open. Pending up to 14 CLEs.


Denver Law Review Announces 2016 Emerging Scholar Award Winner

The Denver Law Review is pleased to announce that it has selected Adam Feldman, a Ph.D. student at the University of Southern California, for the 2016 Emerging Scholar Award.

Click here for more information.


DLR Online Proudly Presents a Special Issue, Navigating the Nuance: Pressing Issues in M&A Law and Practice

DLR Online's new special issue, Navigating the Nuance: Pressing Issues in M&A Law and Practice, features eleven student articles covering recent topics in mergers and acquisitions. This is the first collaboration between the Denver Law Review, DLR Online, and Professor Michael R. Siebecker. 
 
Prior special issues from the DLR Online can be found here.

DLR Online Proudly Presents a Special Issue: The Shareholder Proposal Rule and the SEC

DLR Online's new special issue, The Shareholder Proposal Rule and the SEC, features eleven student articles covering Rule 14a-8, the epicenter of the shareholder rights movement. The issue represents the continued collaboration between the Denver Law Review, DLR Online, and Professor J. Robert Brown, Jr. 
 
Explore a thoughtful introduction to the issue by Professor Brown. Prior special issues from the DLR Online can be found here.

DLR Online Proudly Presents a Special Issue 

Taking it to the Next Level: Your Course, Your Program, Your Career

DLR Online's new special issue, Taking it to the Next Level: Your Course, Your Program, Your Career, features three articles by legal writing Professors who share their experiences in the classroom.

 


Vol. 94 Emerging Scholar Award: Request for Submissions

The Denver Law Review is pleased to announce the 2016 Emerging Scholar Award. This exclusive publication opportunity is open to all scholars who (1) have received their J.D. as of March 1, 2016, (2) have not yet accepted a tenure-track teaching position, and (3) have not held a full-time teaching position for more than three years.

The selected recipient will receive an award of $500, and the Denver Law Review will publish the winning entry in Issue 1, Volume 94, scheduled for early 2017.

Click here for more information.


We've Changed Our Name!

The Denver University Law Review is now the Denver Law Review, and the DULR Online is now DLR Online.


Volume 93 Staff Announced

The Denver Law Review is excited to announce the Volume 93 Staff. Please join us in congratulating them in this accomplishment and supporting them in continuing the fine tradition of the Denver Law Review. Please click here to view the masthead.

Please click here to view the photo masthead.


Denver Law Review Announces Emerging Scholar Award

The Denver Law Review is pleased to announce that it has selected Kate Sablosky Elengold, Practitioner-in-Residence at American University's Washington College of Law, for the Emerging Scholar Award of Volume 93.

Click here for more information!


 

Subscriptions and Submissions

For information on how to subscribe to the Denver Law Review, please click here.

For the guidelines on how to submit an article to the Denver Law Review, please click here.

DLR Online

The online supplement to the Denver Law Review

Sunday
Jul122009

Can One Injure an Unborn Child?

By Courtney Butler

In People v. Lage, the Colorado Court of Appeals was faced with one of the hottest topics in the current legal world: When is an unborn child injured in the womb considered a “person” or “child”?  Defendant, speeding to evade a police officer, swerved into oncoming traffic and caused a head-on collision.  The driver of the other vehicle was eight and one-half months pregnant.  Although delivered alive through an emergency cesarean section, the infant died approximately one hour later due to the blunt force trauma from the collision.

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Wednesday
Jul082009

Trading Guns: The Fourth Amendment’s Reasonable Suspicion Requirements 

By Mike Davidson

In U.S. v. Brown, appellant William Brown was convicted of being a felon in possession of a firearm.  No. 08-8086, (10th Cir. Jun. 9, 2009).  Brown argued that the arresting officer violated his Fourth Amendment rights by pulling over his car without reasonable suspicion.  The Tenth Circuit clarified the Fourth Amendment’s prohibitions by holding that an officer is justified in conducting a traffic stop, and subsequently searching a vehicle, after observing certain suspicious behavior.

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Monday
Jun292009

Showdown at the South Jordan Big Top

By Noah Patterson

The Tenth Circuit refused to hold Salt Lake County employees liable under § 1983 for summoning police to a protest, even if the police improperly disbanded the protesters.

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Wednesday
Jun172009

Dias v. City and County of Denver

By Katy Michaelis

The fight between pit bull owners and the City of Denver still has not ended, and this time the dog-lovers made it all the way to the Tenth Circuit in their challenge.  Diaz v. City and County of Denver, No. 08-1132 (10th Cir., May 27, 2009).  Plaintiffs, three pit bull owners and former residents of Denver, brought constitutional challenges against the City’s pit bull ban, all of which the district court dismissed under F.R.C.P. 12(b)(6) for failure to state a claim.  Plaintiffs claimed that the ordinance was void for vagueness and violated substantive due process under the 14th Amendment.  The Tenth Circuit upheld the district court’s decision to dismiss the vagueness claim but reversed the dismissal of the substantive due process claim and remanded the case for the district court to hear argument on this claim.

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Tuesday
Jun092009

What is Normal?

By Amber L. Blasingame

What is normal?  Or rather, in the legal field, what is competence to stand trial?  According to the Tenth Circuit, competence may include a man who stomps his feet like a child and insists on testifying simultaneously with a witness a la Judge Judy.  United States v. Cornejo-Sandoval, 564 F.3d 1225, 1230 (10th Cir. 2009).  In United States v. Cornejo-Sandoval, the Tenth Circuit concluded that “Defendant was a difficult client, highly suspicious of his lawyers, but ultimately . . . ‘there were no signs of his having compromised competence related capacities.’”

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Monday
Jun012009

Tenth Circuit Bends the Rules for a Defendant Due to Prosecutorial Indiscretion

By Megan Marlatt

In Douglas v. Workman, two Oklahoma inmates on death row were granted new trials due to prosecutorial indiscretion.  Yancy Douglas and Paris Powell were both convicted of murdering a fourteen year old girl in 1993.  Nos. 01-6094, 06-6091, 06-6093, 06-6102 (10th Cir. Mar. 27 2009).  The district court granted Powell a new trial, but, after receiving the same evidence, denied Douglas a new trial.  The Tenth Circuit, however, granted defendant Douglas the relief of a new trial under Brady v. Maryland despite the fact that he failed to meet the requirement under 28 U.S.C. § 2244(b)(2)(B)

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Monday
May182009

Volume 86, O’Connor on Point in Upcoming Supreme Court Decision

By Jake Spratt

The Denver University Law Review’s recent issue on judicial accountability timely foreshadowed a highly anticipated Supreme Court decision regarding judicial elections.

The U.S. Supreme Court recently heard oral arguments in the case of Caperton v. A.T. Massey Coal Company.  At issue in Caperton is whether West Virginia Supreme Court Justice Brent Benjamin’s failure to recuse himself from a political donor’s case violated the claimant’s due process rights.

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Monday
Apr272009

Tenth Circuit Avoids Addressing the Constitutionality of Investigatory Failures

By Jake Spratt

In Nicholas v. Boyd , the Tenth Circuit declined to address whether investigative officials who “cover up” information can be liable for denial of access to the courts under 42 U.S.C. § 1983.

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Monday
Apr202009

Colorado Supreme Court Holds Local School District Funding Does Not Violate the Taxpayer Bill of Rights

By Benjamin Figa

In Mesa County Board of County Commissioners v. State, the Colorado Supreme Court recently addressed the applicability of the Taxpayer Bill of Rights (TABOR) with regard to school funding.  TABOR is a state constitutional amendment (Article X) that limits the amount of tax revenue the state can collect in a given year.  If revenues exceed the limits, the taxing entity must refund the excess money to taxpayers or seek voter permission to retain the surplus.

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Sunday
Apr122009

Summum: Supreme Court Reverses Tenth Circuit on Government Speech

By Ben Figa

The display of a permanent monument in a public park is government speech and not subject to the First Amendment.  The Supreme Court reached this decision recently in Pleasant Grove City v. Summum, No. 07-665, slip op. (Feb. 25, 2009), which reversed the Tenth Circuit’s prior ruling.

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