DLR Online Special Features

Please visit here for a list of special feature editions of the DLR Online.


Events & Announcements

Apr. 4, 2018 - The Denver Law Review is currently accepting submissions for its Recent Developments in the Tenth Circuit issue. For details on the issue and submission instructions, please review this document. We look forward to reviewing all submissions!


Mar. 5, 2018 - The Denver Law Review will soon be accepting submissions for the 2018 Emerging Scholar Award. For details on the award including eligibility, award information, and submission instructions, please review this document. We look forward to reviewing all submissions!


2018 Symposium – Uproar: The Intersection of Animals and the Law

Feb. 9, 2018 - Uproar: The Intersection of Animals and the Law The Denver Law Review  presents its Volume 95 Symposium, Uproar: The Intersection of Animals and the Law. Uproar will explore the relationship between animals and the law.

This event is open to the public. To register for this event, please click here.


Volume 95 Staff Announced

The Denver Law Review is excited to announce the Volume 95 Staff. Please join us in congratulating them in this accomplishment and supporting them in continuing the fine tradition of the Denver Law Review. Please click here to view the masthead.

Please click here to view the photo masthead.


Subscriptions and Submissions

For information on how to subscribe to the Denver Law Review, please click here.

For the guidelines on how to submit an article to the Denver Law Review, please click here.

Tuesday
May232017

The Lack of Adequate Time to Address Deficiencies Under Rule 14a-8(f)

[PDF]

John Ikard

Rule 14a-8 (the Rule) sought to facilitate "functional corporate democracy" between a company's management and shareholders. The Rule allows shareholders to include proposals in a company's proxy materials. Management can, however, exclude a proposal on a number of substantive and procedural grounds. Subsection (f) requires that companies provide proponents with notice of, and an opportunity to correct, certain procedural deficiencies. Issuers have fourteen days to issue the notice and shareholders have the same period to respond.

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Tuesday
May232017

Limiting the Limited Number of Shareholder Proposals under   Rule 14a-8

[PDF]

Renee Himes

Rule 14a-8 (the Rule) provides shareholders with the opportunity to advise corporate action through inclusion of proposals in a company's proxy statement. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC or Commission) qualified the availability of the provision through a number of procedural thresholds for submission as well as substantive grounds for exclusion. These include a limit to a single submission per shareholder to each company.

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Tuesday
May232017

What’s in a Name: Rule 14a-8(l) and the Identification of Shareholder Proponents

[PDF]

Erin Stutz

Section 14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 authorizes the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to adopt proxy rules "necessary or appropriate in the public interest or for the protection of investors." Pursuant to this authority, the SEC in 1942 promulgated Rule 14a-8 in order to give shareholders a greater voice in the corporate governance process. Requiring the inclusion of shareholder proposals in a company's proxy statement, the rule also contains a number of procedural conditions and substantive limitations. Specifically, a shareholder may not submit more than one proposal to a single company and proposals cannot exceed 500 words.

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Tuesday
May232017

Excluding Proposals in the Absence of Corporate Authority

[PDF]

Donovan Gibbons

Rule 14a-8 requires inclusion of a properly submitted shareholder proposal in the company's proxy statement. The Rule, however, also includes thirteen substantive grounds for exclusion. Specifically, subsections (i)(6) permits omission of a proposal if "the company would lack the power or authority to implement the proposal."

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Tuesday
May232017

Finding the Grievance in the Personal Grievance Exclusion

[PDF]

Jon Wagner

Rule 14a-8 (the Rule) requires the inclusion of a shareholder proposal in a company's proxy statement. The Rule, however, provides thirteen substantive grounds for exclusion. Subsection (i)(4) allows for the omission of proposals relating to the "redress of a personal claim or grievance against the company or any other person." Originally introduced to prevent "abuse of the [shareholder proposal] rule," the exclusion sought to eliminate proposals intending to "achieve personal ends . . . not necessarily in the common interest of . . . security holders generally."

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Wednesday
Apr192017

Two Bills Demonstrate the Difficulty in Legislating Teen Sexting

[PDF]

Jennifer Eyl

In November 2016, Cañon City High School, in Cañon City, Colorado, was rocked by a scandal involving 300 sexually explicit images of students being shared among more than 100 teenagers. This case, and others around the country, have caused considerable consternation among prosecutors, school officials, parents, and those who want to ensure juveniles do not suffer criminal consequences for acting like teenagers in the age of easily created, shared and exploited digital images.

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Wednesday
Apr052017

Will the Colorado Supreme Court Prevent a Potential Statewide Auto Insurance Crisis? The Impact of the Court of Appeals’ Decision in Fisher v. State Farm

[PDF]

Evan Stephenson & Shari L. Wall

On May 7, 2015, the Colorado Court of Appeals dramatically changed how auto insurers must pay benefits under uninsured and underinsured motorist (UIM) policies. In Fisher v. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co., the court interpreted two general insurance-penalty statutes enacted in 2008 to require every UIM insurer statewide to operate effectively as a first-party health insurance operation.

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Thursday
Mar302017

Symposium Note: Blank Check in the Criminal Justice System

[PDF]

Jenny Nelson

On Friday, February 3, 2017, at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law, Professor Gabriel J. Chin, from the University of California Davis, spoke at the Denver Law Review Symposium on Justice Reinvestment. Prof. Chin incorporated an article he is currently writing for the Denver Law Review into his presentation titled, Blank Check in the Criminal Justice System. The presentation focused on the power sharing issue affecting players in the criminal justice system.

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Tuesday
Mar282017

Increasing the Minimum Wage Through Direct Democracy

[PDF]

Kristin L. Arthur

On January 1, 2017, nineteen states saw their minimum wages increase. Colorado, like four other states, increased its minimum wage through direct democracy; in this case, through a voter-initiated constitutional amendment. Colorado is one of twenty-nine states to have a minimum wage higher than the federal minimum wage. All increases in Colorado's minimum wage since the turn of the century have been through voter-initiated methods.

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Monday
Mar272017

Symposium Note: Implementing Justice Reinvestment at the State Level

[PDF]

Alec Martinez

Alternative incentive structures and competing economic interests served as primary themes in the Denver Law Review's symposium panel discussing the implementation of justice reinvestment at the state level. In spite of the unfortunate absence of Denise Maes of the ACLU of Colorado, a two-person panel consisting of Professor David Ball of Santa Clara Law and Liz Ryan, president and CEO of Youth First!, proved to be among the most salient presentations in this year's symposium. Moderated by Hannah Proff of Johnson, Brennan & Klein, each panelist discussed obstacles to justice reform and opportunities for reform at the state level.

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