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Cyber Civil Rights 

Part Three: How to Regulate?

Part One - Contextualizing Online Harassment

Part Two - The Privacy Problem

Friday
Oct232009

Part Four: Content Matters: Evaluating Blogs and Online Supplements as Scholarship

This post continues a five-part series examining legal scholarship in the electronic world.  Part V will appear within the next week.  Alan Chen is the Associate Dean for Faculty Scholarship and Professor at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law. Professor Chen publishes in the areas of constitutional law and civil liberties. You can find his research here.

Alan K. Chen

What role do blogs and online law review supplements play in evaluating faculty for hiring and promotion purposes?  As new ways of disseminating knowledge evolve, all law schools will have to struggle with this and other questions.  I offer only a tentative prediction here, because I think we will need more collective experience before we fully understand how these materials fit into traditional academic literature.  Moreover, as Ellen Podgor has observed, it is altogether possible that before long, even these relatively new media will be supplemented or surpassed by other methods for conveying scholarly ideas.  Such developments could require us to rethink the whole field again.

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Wednesday
Oct212009

Part Three: Linking “Electronic Scholarship” and “Traditional Scholarship”

This post continues a five-part series examining legal scholarship in the electronic world.  Parts IV-V will appear during the next two weeks. Sam Kamin is an Associate Professor at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law. He has served as a blogger on Concurring Opinions, MoneyLaw, and PrawfsBlawg, among others.  You can find his research here.

By Sam Kamin

There is a wide variety of law blogs on the market today.  Some of these blogs cover law school gossip—the comings and goings of faculty and deans, the rankings of schools, and the like.  Some are a resource on substantive law, a place to keep up with daily judicial opinions and legislative developments.  Some are of general interest, providing a way to keep a finger on the pulse of the legal academy, to know what issues and topics are making the rounds and garnering interest.  Faculty read these blogs and write for them to engage in debate and discussions with their colleagues scattered throughout the country.

However, blogs are more than just a way to keep on top of the issues of the day; they have also become an important and emerging tool in the production of faculty scholarship.  Faculty use blogs to aid their scholarship in at least two important ways.  First, blogs are a place to do legal research—to find answers to important substantive questions.  Second, blogs are a way to get valuable, early feedback on scholarly ideas.

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Monday
Oct192009

Part Two: Connecting Laypeople with the Law Through Blogs

This post continues a five-part series examining legal scholarship in the electronic world.  Parts III-V will appear during the next two weeks. Dave Kopel is Director of Research at the Independence Institute, and a permanent blogger on The Volokh Conspiracy.

By Dave Kopel

Blogging is creating a Golden Age of legal scholarship.  For the first time in the memory of any living person, legal scholarship is now connecting with an audience beyond the world of law professors and legal professionals.

Legal blogs today are the primary medium by which non-lawyers can learn about interesting new law review articles.  As a result, the right article may be read by an audience of thousands, or occasionally, tens of thousands.  And once in a while, over a hundred thousand—as was Jim Lindgren’s Yale Law Journal article exposing the pervasive fraud in Michael Bellesiles’ award-winning book Armed America, which had made up many sources and lied about many others in order to support a fraudulent claim that guns were rare in early America.

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Wednesday
Oct142009

Legal Scholarship in the Internet Age: An Introduction

This post begins a five-part series examining legal scholarship in the electronic world.  Parts II-V will appear during the next two weeks.

This series marks the formal launching of the Denver University Law Review’s online supplement, DULR Online. The DU Law Review is not the first to test the utility of an online counterpart to a law journal; several other journals have already established online forums.  Despite this growing trend, many questions about the role of electronic resources in legal scholarship remain unanswered.

This series aims to expand upon a few of the issues surrounding online legal scholarship. Dave Kopel begins the discussion by examining how online resources enable the direct and relatively unfiltered dissemination of ideas to students, scholars, and laypeople.  Mr. Kopel compares this to the use and later abandonment of “law French” during the thirteenth century.

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